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City for Sale: the commodification of Edinburgh’s public spaces – publication of presentations

Posted on 24 Jan 2020 by Lucy

A hugely successful public meeting held on 22 January in the Central Halls in Tollcross was attended by a full capacity audience of 850 members of the public.

Facilitated by Broadcaster and journalist Stephen Jardine, presentations were received from experts and community champions.  We publish these today for the interest and information of those who attended and those who didn’t.  We plan to prepare a full precise of the meeting and issues raised in the next few weeks.

Professor David McGillivray,  School of Media, Culture and Society at University of the West of Scotland (UWS). David has been involved in research exploring the role of major events in the transformation of urban space and how digital and social media enables (and contrains) participation in civic life, including in educational settings and in democractic processes.   

David’s presentation on Festivalisation and the privatisation of public spaces can be found here.

 

Professor Cliff Hague, Professor Emeritus of Planning and Spatial Development at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, Past President of the Royal Town Planning Institute and of the Commonwealth Association of Planners and Chair of the Cockburn Association.

Cliff’s presentation City for Sale? An Edinburgh Perspective can be found here.

 

Dr Michelle Hipwell, Accredited Health Psychologist and active member of the Astley Ainslie Community Trust.

Michele’s presentation Saving our green spaces for health and well-being can be found here.

 

Mariana Trusson, Chartered Engineer who specialises in sustainable design strategy. She has led building physics, health, well-being and sustainability teams for consultancies in Scotland and the North East, and was the former Chair of the Edinburgh Sustainable Development Partnership.

Mariana’s presentation Sustainable Public Spaces and environmental well-being can be found here.

 

In addition, Andy Wightman, writer, researcher, Land Reform Campaigner and MSP, best known for his work on land ownership in Scotland gave an expert talk on Common Good land and the failure of local authorities across Scotland to effectively manage common goods assets.